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...days since Raleigh City Council discontinued Citizen Advisory Councils (CACs) with NO REPLACEMENT.

Time until the 2022 Raleigh City Council election:

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Your Taxes Raised 22%, Council’s Pay Raised 82%

Your Taxes Raised 22%, Council’s Pay Raised 82%

During their term in office, Mayor Mary-Ann Baldwin and City Councilors have raised your taxes by nearly 22% and Council's pay by 82%.First, some background facts:  Mayor Baldwin and City Council took office in Dec 2019. Each spring the council approves a budget for...

The “Best” City Council Money Can Buy.

The “Best” City Council Money Can Buy.

First we “Showed You the Money.” Then we “Followed the Money.” In this third of our series about the money in Raleigh’s politics, we examine the effects of Special Interest money pouring into the campaigns.

Baldwin “Reconsiders” Giving Money to Other Democrats?

Baldwin “Reconsiders” Giving Money to Other Democrats?

Mary-Ann Baldwin, the mayor of Raleigh, has some $500,000 banked for her election campaign. It’s a tribute to how completely she’s owned by Raleigh’s developers – led by mega-spender John Kane, a right-wing Republican known for backing, among other crazies, our very own GOP Lieutenant Governor Mark Robinson. (And, of course, Trump.)

In a New Poll of Key Issues, Raleigh Voters Call for Change

In a New Poll of Key Issues, Raleigh Voters Call for Change

As the NC primary election season comes to an end and the summer season arrives, it is time to start focusing on Raleigh's upcoming municipal elections. We are rerunning this release of polling data showing what Raleigh voters think of their local city government. You...

Multiply your Vote!

Multiply your Vote!

Every Raleigh voter gets four votes in the November City Council election – one for Mayor, one for your District representative*, and one each for the two at-large seats. But wait – there’s more. Every council member gets to vote on every issue and it takes five votes...

Follow the Money

Follow the Money

As a follow-up to Livable Raleigh’s previous blog, “Show Me the Money”, about the development community money spent in the 2019 City Council election, this time we look at the specifics for individual Councilors.

Baldwin’s new downtown cocktail: Mix booze and guns; add open carry and shake, don’t stir.

Baldwin’s new downtown cocktail: Mix booze and guns; add open carry and shake, don’t stir.

But wait, it’s also the case that state law allows the open carry of firearms not just in downtown Raleigh but everywhere. Raleigh has seen its share of armed “Proud Boys” and other Patriots on downtown streets already. What we haven’t seen yet – but may soon – are armed drinkers in the streets, with our under-staffed police force watching and, uh, watching – because drinking while armed will be perfectly legal.

City of Raleigh losing trees at an alarming rate

City of Raleigh losing trees at an alarming rate

Your relentless drive to spread density everywhere is going to be the death knell for the remaining urban forests in our older subdivisions. You are riding the crest of the tree removal wave, as well as the steady progression towards increased traffic gridlock.

City Council Candidates are Off and Running. Livable Raleigh will provide the play-by-play!

City Council Candidates are Off and Running. Livable Raleigh will provide the play-by-play!

The filing period for candidates in Raleigh’s November 8th Mayoral and City Council elections closed Friday, July 15, at noon. It’s an interesting slate of candidates, with a mix of returning incumbents, unknown newcomers and even a couple well known Council retirees coming back for another run. Raleigh voters will be able to count on Livable Raleigh to provide all the information needed to be an informed voter in November.

Help Us to Help You

Help Us to Help You

If you rely on the kind of information you are only able to find through Livable Raleigh, we need your help to be able to continue to provide that valuable information to you. Livable Raleigh has become the “go-to” source for the most complete, honest, fact-based...

Bus waste of money

Bus waste of money

Bob Mulder, former Chair Raleigh Planning Commission, recently wrote to the City Council and local media outlets about Community Engagement:Recently the Raleigh City Council voted to spend $350,000 on a community engagement bus that is supposed to replace the 27 or so...

Litter is pollution

Litter is pollution

Litter is not just an eyesore. Litter and trash on our city streets and sidewalks also tell people it’s ok to drop their disposables anywhere, and it tells visitors that we don’t give a darn about how our inner city looks. Conditions here will not positively impress anyone thinking about moving to Raleigh or locating a business here.

What makes a public comment a public comment?

What makes a public comment a public comment?

The Mayor and Council members need to step up and prove what they’re worth, especially after voting substantial salary increases for their positions. They need to do the right thing…listen to ALL their constituents and perform or get fired!

N&O says Raleigh Needs Better Answers

N&O says Raleigh Needs Better Answers

With your help, we are expanding our outreach and partnerships to engage voters and candidates about the most important city issues and highlighting the better answers Raleigh residents want and deserve.

July 5 2022 Raleigh City Council Meeting

July 5 2022 Raleigh City Council Meeting

HIGHLIGHTS Roberta Fox re-elected as Chair, Planning Commission, and Blannie Miller elected as Vice Chair, Planning Commission. New rules adopted for public participation including “loud noises such as singing, disruptive clapping, shouting, playing instruments,...

City Council — Uphold the Midtown Area Plan that YOU approved in 2020

City Council — Uphold the Midtown Area Plan that YOU approved in 2020

This Mayor and Council need to be reminded that they unanimously supported the Midtown – Saint Albans area plan in December 2020! We have asked the developer, Kane Realty, to address fundamental or conditional changes in Z-67-21 before the Council hearing on July 5.