Emerging possibilities & hope

Emerging possibilities & hope

In the three years since their abominable vote, the City has continually promised to bring forth new and revolutionary citizen engagement opportunities. We’re still waiting. But now we have some reason for hope. With your help, four new council members were elected in November who value restoration of community engagement as a high priority.

3 Years Ago a Sneak Attack on Raleigh’s Community Engagement System took place: Residents Lost, Developers Won.

3 Years Ago a Sneak Attack on Raleigh’s Community Engagement System took place: Residents Lost, Developers Won.

Three years ago on February 4, 2020 Mayor Baldwin and her City Council majority voted to stop supporting Raleigh’s Citizen Advisory Councils (CACs). Three years later that void still exists. There are no new community organizations run by Raleigh residents with City support. Fortunately for Raleigh residents there are quite a few Citizen Advisory Councils that survived the sneak attack on February 4, 2020. Even without City funding and support, these survivors have continued on with their mission of two-way communication between Raleigh residents and their City government.

Raleigh City Council Retreat — January 28, 2023, Day 2

Raleigh City Council Retreat — January 28, 2023, Day 2

HIGHLIGHTS Councilors Jones and Black ask for agenda changes to address priorities Community Engagement Board’s immediate focus will be on improving public comment process and access to community centers for CACs New councilors ask to be involved in reviewing and...

Re-engaging with the community BOTH immediately and long-term.

Re-engaging with the community BOTH immediately and long-term.

Livable Raleigh supports today’s proposal for community engagement put forward by Councilors Jones and Harrison. You don’t have to wait for your council retreat at the end of January where you will be discussing your longer-term solutions, you could act tonight to give CACs access to community centers with a simple motion and a vote directing staff to make it happen.

Single-Family Zoning is not Exclusionary nor is it Discriminatory

Single-Family Zoning is not Exclusionary nor is it Discriminatory

Missing-Middle development grants serious money-making potential to developers, while single-family neighborhoods get nothing in return. Developers need to give something back, and the previous City Councilors — especially those who were re-elected, should logically support a strong inclusionary ordinance.

City Council Meeting Highlights — December 6, 2022

City Council Meeting Highlights — December 6, 2022

HIGHLIGHTS Corey Branch will be Mayor Pro Tem for the first year and Jonathan Melton will be Mayor Pro Tem for the second year. Council Committee assignments will be announced either at December 13 work session or in January. Councilors asked to submit preferences to...

Livable Raleigh’s proposal for renewed engagement

Livable Raleigh’s proposal for renewed engagement

With the election of four new Councilors, Raleigh voters have made it clear that restoring and improving city support for the public’s involvement in community affairs is a top priority. After three years, the voters know that waiting for a perfect solution is unrealistic and will only further delay city support for the essential and imperfect community conversations that are the foundation of an informed democracy. It is with this sense of purpose that the Livable Raleigh Advisory Committee offers six policy-level proposals for quick adoption. Our hope is that these proposals will have several positive effects:

Raleigh’s voters responded to the challenge

Raleigh’s voters responded to the challenge

In May of 2022 we ran a piece challenging voters to restore democracy to the City of Raleigh by dedicating the November election to restoring former Mayor Clarence Lightner's vision for community engagement in Raleigh. Well, the voters responded to our challenge in...

A Retrospective on The Raleigh City Council Election

A Retrospective on The Raleigh City Council Election

The election is over and people have spoken. Baldwin and Council have forced unpopular and failed policies on Raleigh. With very few financial resources, challengers pushed back and have taken back Council despite incumbents and candidates endorsed by, and heavily financed by, wealthy developers and realtors.

With this win, let the citizens of Raleigh look forward to better days as well as to more changes in 2024.